Educator Resources

Citing your TEACH membership on your CV:

(**your membership level), Teaching Excellence Academy for Collaborative Healthcare (**your institution). Start Year-End Year. TEACH membership is based on active participation. Emerging level membership offers numerous opportunities throughout the year to develop as and network with other health professions educators; Skilled level membership recognizes accomplished health professions educators and offers numerous opportunities throughout the year to develop as and network with other health professions educators; OR Advanced level membership is the highest level of membership and also bears the responsibility of contributing back to the Academy by way of developing others as educators via participation on the TEACH Steering Committee, subcommittees, leading faculty development sessions or journal clubs, mentoring other members, and/or other similar faculty development activities related to teaching.

**Example:
Advanced level, Teaching Excellence Academy for Collaborative Healthcare, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. 2015-current. TEACH membership is based on active participation. Advanced membership is the highest level of membership and also bears the responsibility of contributing back to the Academy by way of developing others as educators via participation on the TEACH Steering Committee, subcommittees, leading faculty development sessions or journal clubs, mentoring other members, and/or other similar faculty development activities related to teaching.


Reading List for Health Profession Educators

A reading list primarily assembled and commented on by Gail Sullivan, MD, Editor in Chief of the Journal of Graduate Medical Education (JGME). If you submit a paper to the Journal of Graduate Medical Education, it is likely that you may be referred to one or more of these articles. Dr. Sullivan states, “This list is not intended to be comprehensive, or to replace a systematic review of influential articles in medical education. Instead, these articles represent idiosyncratic choices that may provide a gentle nudge to start reading outside your clinical field to enhance your educator tool kit.”

Please send us your recommendations of other similar articles to add to this list!


DR MERL

DR MERL stands for Dependable Reviews of Medical Education Research Literature. As the name implies, DR MERL is a collection of reviews of the latest research in medical education. Academic Medicine, Medical Education and Teaching and Learning In Medical Education are a few of the medical education journals regularly scanned by our reviewers to find interesting and relevant research articles. Physicians and medical school educators (from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and other medical schools) then write short 150-200 word reviews. The goal of DR MERL is to disseminate succinct reviews of medical education research to our teaching faculty to keep them up-to-date on the most important medical education research. DR MERL has over 150 reviews and covers both undergraduate and graduate medical education topics, such as evaluations, feedback, OSCEs, etc. DR MERL has a broad readership in the United States and internationally. DR MERL is endorsed by the Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).


Writing Effective Learning Objectives

A statement of a learning objective contains a measurable action verb and an object (usually a noun).

  • The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the intended cognitive process.
  • The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected to acquire or construct. (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5)
  • Oftentimes it is helpful to precede the objective verb with something along the lines of, “By the end of this activity, learners will be able to…”

See this helpful interactive tool for helping to choose effective learning objective verbs using Bloom’s Taxonomy…http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/effective-teaching-practices/revised-blooms-taxonomy


Interested in reflective writing?

Pulse–voices from the heart of medicine can send you and your students a fresh, high-quality, first-person story or poem every Friday afternoon via email. It’s easy to subscribe. Pulse pieces are written by students, patients, physicians and other health professionals–and come with a visual or haiku.  Created in 2008 by Albert Einstein’s Department of Family and Social Medicine, Pulse now has over 10,000 subscribers. Compelling Pulse stories are used to teach students self-reflection, humanism and professionalism.  It’s easy for you and your students to subscribe to Pulse–and it’s free!


Med Ed Briefs: Teaching & Learning in Medicine has collaborated with the Alliance for Clinical Education Collaboration to create Med Ed Briefs.  Med Ed Briefs are pulled from existing articles and contain brief summaries that incorporate specific ideas about how the work can be applied. This initiative is intended to support the busy medical educator struggling to keep up with the literature. The very first Med Ed Brief is online now courtesy of Scott Graziano from the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics.  To read the brief, click here


SGEA Newsletter Teaching Tip: Jean Bailey, PhD (Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Associate Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine) recently shared some tips in the SGEA Newsletter for faculty as they begin the Fall semester. Click here to read some of the practical tips from Dr. Bailey on navigating the virtual environment and how to apply similar approaches to orienting new faculty.


Free Access to Academic Medicine Articles Related to COVID-19: Academic Medicine is offering free access to articles which explore the COVID-19 pandemic, its impact on medical education, and medical education’s response to it, from multiple perspectives. The collection is updated regularly as new articles are published. Read the complete collection here.