Archived Health Professions Educator series from 2015 to March 2020

*Note: These sessions are no longer eligible for CME credit but are still eligible Faculty Development Related to Teaching Credit.

For instructions on how to log video-recorded sessions into Digital Measures for your annual requirements related to teaching click here.


Video Index (Click on title to jump to your preferred video)

March 2019: Best Practices for Non-Boring Sessions by Renee LeClair, PhD and Andrew Binks, PhD
Teaching Learners How to Deliver Bad News/Engaging in Difficult Conversations by Christi Stewart, MD
Move Over Millenials: Welcome GenZ into your Classroom by Lesa Hanlin, PhD
The Patient-Centered Method: The What, Why, and When of It by Dr. Rick Butler
Cognitive Bias by Dr. Sarah Parker
Blended Learning by Dr. Jeannine Everhart
Feedback by Dr. David Musick
Presentation Skills by Dr. Jon Sweet
Teaching Methods by Drs. Chad DeMott, Andrew Binks, and Renee LeClair
Writing Objectives that Link to Outcomes by Dr. John Epling
Evidence Based Education by Kim Whiter
Challenging Learners by Emily Holt
The Flipped Classroom, Part 1, by Drs. Andrew Binks and Renee LeClair
The Flipped Classroom, Part 2, by Drs. Andrew Binks and Renee LeClair
The Flipped Classroom, Part 3, by Drs Andrew Binks and Renee LeClair
Spirituality in Medicine by Dr. David Musick
Interprofessional Education at VTCSOM and JCHS by Dr. Wilton Kennedy
Age-ism in Medical Education by Dr. Brian Unwin
Simple Techniques for Using Technology to Enhance Your Teaching by Dr. David Halpin
Inpatient Teaching by Dr. Chad DeMott
Direct Observation to Enhance Learning and Assessment by Dr. Isaiah Johnson
Using the DiSC to Enhance Your Teaching by Neely Conner
Creating a Positive Learning Environment & Avoiding Learner Mistreatment By Drs. Musick, Adams-Vanke, and Knight
A Most Difficult Professional Conversation That Informs All Others: Seeking, Receiving, Responding to, and Growing From Feedback by Dr. Mark Greenawald
Voice Over PowerPoints by Dr. Bob Reese
Concept Mapping by Drs. Milena Staykova and Rhoda Murray
Cultural Considerations for Health Professions Educators by Dr. Laura Welfare
Scholarship in Medical Education by Dr. David Musick
Technology in the Classroom by Dr. Corey Heitz
Which of the Following? Audience Response Systems in the Classroom by Dr. Corey Heitz
One Minute Preceptor by Dr. Bruce Johnson
Revving Up PowerPoint by Dr. Corey Heitz
Curriculum Development by Dr. Shari Whicker
Flipping the Medical Education Classroom by Dr. Corey Heitz
Simulation in Healthcare by Dr. Tim Fortuna


Best Practices for Non-Boring Sessions by Drs. Renee LeClair, Chair of Biomedical Sciences, VTCSOM and Andrew Binks, Director of Faculty Development of Basic Sciences at VTCSOM

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Discuss best practices for session planning and generation of student preparation materials.
  • Describe the elements of a safe learning environment and framing questions to generate discussion.
  • Describe variations of classroom strategies ranging from novice to expert

PowerPoint: Best Practices for Non-Boring Sessions

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Teaching Learners How to Deliver Bad News/Engaging in Difficult Conversations by Christi Stewart, MD, Geriatric Medicine, Carilion Clinic

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Describe structured format for difficult conversations.
  • Prepare learners to establish learning goals and deliberate practice in the setting of difficult conversations.
  • Provide immediate feedback to learners regarding difficult conversations.

PowerPoint: Teaching Learners How to Deliver Bad News/Engaging in Difficult Conversations

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Move Over Millenials: Welcome GenZ into your Classroom by Lesa Hanlin, PhD, Executive Director, Roanoke Regional Initiatives, Virginia Tech

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Define Generation Z and describe their general characteristics
  • Compare the major shifts that are occurring from Millennials to Generation Z
  • Identify shifts we must make as educators in order to teach and engage this generation
  • Apply the information presented to develop lessons, and motivate and grow these students

PowerPoint: Move Over Millenials:  Welcome GenZ into your Classroom

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The Patient-Centered Method: The What, Why, and When of It by Dr. Rick Butler, Formerly of Internal Medicine, Carilion Clinic

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session , you should be able to:

  • Define a communication model of patient-centered skills within the medical encounter and contrast these to more clinician-centered skills.
  • Understand how patient-centered skills can integrate into a broader model of evidence-based care.
  • Understand the impact, or lack of impact, of patient-centered skills on outcomes of the medical encounter.
  • Improve one’s ability to observe and teach patient-centered skills.

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Cognitive Bias by Dr. Sarah Parker, Assistant Professor, Basic Science Education, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Research Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Director of Human Factors Research, Carilion Clinic, Research Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Science, Virginia Tech

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Identify human cognitive biases and articulate why they occur
  • Identify processes or interactions common in medical practice that are highly susceptible to bias
  • Articulate the difference between implicit and explicit bias and the influence that these mechanisms have on patient care
  • Identify common technology solutions designed to minimize cognitive bias in healthcare

PowerPoint: Cognitive Bias

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Blended Learning by Dr. Jeannine Everhart, Program Director, Doctor of Health Sciences and Assistant Professor, Department of Health Sciences Administration, Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Compare and contrast in class, on line, flipped, and hybrid teaching methods
  • Discuss the benefits and challenges to using blended learning teaching methods
  • Describe common blended learning techniques
  • List steps to assist in migrating a course from a traditional to a blended format

PowerPoint: Blended Learning

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Feedback by Dr. David Musick, Director Interprofessionalism Domain, and Professor Internal Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Professor, Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Define feedback including the difference between feedback & assessment/evaluation
  • Discuss the role of effective feedback in the education of physicians
  • Review effective methods of giving & receiving feedback

PowerPoint: Feedback

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Presentation Skills by Dr. Jon Sweet, Internal Medicine Carilion Clinic and Associate Professor Internal Medicine VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Employs common tips derived from effective speakers to improve your presentation skills
  • Produce slides that are effective and audience-centered
  • Choose effective non-verbal presentation skills

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Teaching Methods by Drs. Chad DeMott, Andrew Binks, and Renee LeClair

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Adapt traditional teaching methods to engage the learner in higher order learning
  • Utilize a variety of pedagogies within the classroom setting
  • Identify challenges specific to delivery method that may negatively impact overall success
  • Identify do’s and don’ts of clinical teaching
  • Adapt personal teaching experiences to reflect do’s and don’ts of clinical teaching.

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Writing Objectives that Link to Outcomes by Dr. John Epling, Professor, Family and Community Medicine Carilion Clinic and VTCSOM

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  1. Write well-constructed learning objectives for sessions and courses. (“ABCD”)
  2. Tailor their learning objectives to the desired level of learning. (“Kirkpatrick outcomes”)
  3. Adopt an instructional design model to their session and course planning. (“The Nine Events of Instruction”)

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Evidence Based Education by Kimberly Whiter, MSEd, Director of Faculty Development and Interprofessional Education, Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  1. Associate evidence-based pedagogies with related cognitive learning theories.
  2. Chose evidence-based pedagogies that work best for subject and setting for which you are teaching.
  3. Within a collegial environment, share ideas/successes/failures and learn with my peers.

Handouts:

The Socratic Method

Lecturing with Storytelling/Case Studies

Interactive Lectures

Demonstration Lectures

References for Evidence

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Challenging Learners by Emily Holt, MA, Director of Academic Counseling and Enrichment Services, VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Explain academic factors that foster learner challenges
  • Explain personal factors that foster learner struggle
  • Describe teaching & learning factors that contribute to academic struggle
  • Describe workplace factors that contribute to academic struggle
  • Apply ways to mitigate various elements that contribute to creating & fostering challenging learners

PowerPoint: Challenging Learners

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The Flipped Classroom, Part 1, by Andrew Binks, PhD and Renee LeClair, PhD

Objectives:

  • Describe a clear method for development of an effective student centered activity from any didactic content.
  • Compare the emphasis and importance of the roles of educator and student in the didactic and dynamic classrooms.
  • Appreciate the critical importance of specific learning outcomes and clear student preparation materials for the development of a dynamic classroom.
  • Utilize or adapt faculty developed learning outcomes to drive activity development and assessment.
  • Adapt or design creative resources to facilitate student preparedness for the dynamic classroom.
  • Align content with objectives, resources and assessment prior to development.

PowerPoint

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The Flipped Classroom, Part 2, by Andrew Binks, PhD and Renee LeClair, PhD

Objectives:

  • Align content with objectives, resources and assessment prior to development (from Session 1).
  • Create assessments to evaluate basic knowledge and higher level learning (e.g. STEP 1 type question or EPA).
  • Utilize content topics to drive session development and set boundaries for the session.
  • Discuss methods for generating a safe learning environment, which is essential to a dynamic classroom.
  • Appreciate the importance of the 5 S’s (significant, same, specific, simultaneous and summarize) in creating classroom experience.

PowerPoint

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The Flipped Classroom, Part 3, by Andrew Binks, PhD and Renee LeClair, PhD

Objectives:

  • Apply the principles of the 5 S’s to generate a student-centered activity. (from Session 2)
  • Apply fundamentals of learning theory to empower both the faculty and the student to achieve higher level learning in the classroom setting.
  • Effectively link assessments with learning outcomes and dynamic delivery to ensure student success.
  • Discover the importance of content integration for application, long-term retention and optimal use of classroom time.

PowerPoint

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Spirituality in Medicine by Dr. David Musick

Objectives:

  • To introduce the role of spirituality in health care
  • To introduce the idea of “taking a spiritual history”
  • To provide brief overview on research about patient & physician spirituality & its impact on health & illness outcomes

PowerPoint: Spirituality in Medicine

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Interprofessional Education at VTCSOM and JCHS by Dr. Wilton Kennedy

Objectives:

  • Discuss the need for IPE for the US healthcare system
  • Describe the key structure of IPE programs at VTC and JCHS
  • Identify lessons learned and future directions in achieving IPE goals

PowerPoint: Interprofessional Education

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Age-ism in Medical Education by Dr. Brian Unwin, Internal Medicine Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

  • Describe the multifaceted domains of Ageism in our culture
  • Describe the clinical impacts of Ageism in patient care
  • Discuss evidence-based interventions in medical education to address the problem

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Simple Techniques for Using Technology to Enhance Your Teaching by David Halpin, PhD, Application Analyst JCHS

Objectives:

  • Apply strategies to make lectures and presentations more engaging.
  • Utilize technologies that support a more active learning environment.
  • Apply free tools that can enhance your teaching.

PowerPoint: Techniques for Using Technology in Teaching

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Inpatient Teaching by Chad DeMott, MD, Internal Medicine Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

  • Review various challenges or threats to inpatient teaching.
  • Design, categorize or outline an approach to inpatient rounds.
  • Discover various teaching pearls, tips, and strategies to enhance our growth as educators.
  • Select at least one of the above pearls to apply to our teaching.

PowerPoint: Inpatient Teaching

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Direct Observation to Enhance Learning and Assessment by Isaiah Johnson, MD, OB/Gyn Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

  • At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:Define direct observation/workplace based assessment
  • Identify barriers to direct observation and strategies to overcome them
  • Demonstrate the use of Entrustable Professional Activities based assessment in direct observation

PowerPoint: Direct Observation

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Using the DiSC to Enhance Your Teaching by Neely Conner, LCSW, Manager Employee Assistance Program, Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, you should be able to:

  • Identify strengths and challenges within their individual DiSC Profile.
  • Develop understanding of how their style impacts their role as an educator.
  • Develop and implement strategies that will increase their efficacy and enjoyment of their role.

PowerPoint: DiSC to Enhance Teaching

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Creating a Positive Learning Environment & Avoiding Learner Mistreatment by David Musick, PhD, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development VTCSOM and Director Continuing Professional Development Carilion Clinic/VTCSOM, Aubrey Knight, MD, Medical Director Inpatient Palliative Care Carilion Clinic and Associate Dean for Student Affairs VTCSOM, Felicity Adams-Vanke, MD, Program Director Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

  • Explain the concept of the learning environment and why it is prominent in health professions education
  • Review existing accreditation requirements concerning this topic
  • Review a sample of the research literature on this topic
  • Illustrate positive and negative aspects of the learning environment for health professions learners through case scenarios
  • Recognize methods for reporting issues related to the learning environment
  • Consider ways in which we can continually improve the learning environment

PowerPoint: Positive Learning Environment

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A Most Difficult Professional Conversation That Informs All Others: Seeking, Receiving, Responding to, and Growing From Feedback by Mark Greenawald, MD, Vice Chair for Academic Affairs and Professional Development Carilion Clinic, Professor and Vice Chair of Family and Community Medicine VTCSOM, and Medical Director of Physician Leadership and Professional Development Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

  • Identify personal barriers to regularly and actively seeking feedback.
  • Compare the “I ACT” approach to seeking feedback to your present approach.
  • Identify your own “Feedback Network” and articulate a professional goal for which you will actively seek feedback using the approach discussed during the session

PowerPoint: A Most Difficult Professional Conversation That Informs All Others: Seeking, Receiving, Responding to, and Growing From Feedback

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Voice Over PowerPoints by Dr. Bob Reese, Program Director Health Psychology, Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Objectives:

  • Recognize the need for engagement to enhance learning
  • Comprehend Why Voice-Over PPT is valuable for engagement
  • Appreciate the impact of VO-PPT on all three learning styles
  • Review research on VO-PPT
  • Experience “How to” create a VO-PPT

PowerPoint: Voice Over PowerPoints

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Concept Mapping by Milena Staykova, EdD, APRN, FNP-BC, Associate Professor and Post-licensure Program Director for Department of Nursing, Jefferson College Health Sciences and Rhoda Murray, PhD, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor Nursing and Associate Program Director MSN-FNP Program Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Objectives:

  • Compare traditional to a concept mapping priority of care assignment and student’s learning preferences based on the Gardner’s multiple intelligence theory.
  • Discuss concept mapping as a tool to engage students in active learning.
  • Network with colleagues from an academic institution.

PowerPoint: Concept Mapping

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Cultural Consideration for Health Professions Educators by Dr. Laura Welfare
Associate Professor Education Virginia Tech and Assistant Professor Interprofessionalism VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Identify strategies for recognizing varied learner cultural identities.
  • Describe how cultural identities impact learner needs.
  • Describe strategies for creating a environment wherein learners from varied cultural identities can be successful.

PowerPoint: Cultural Considerations for Health Professions Educators

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Scholarship in Medical Education: It’s MORE Than Rocket Science by Dr. David Musick
Assistant Dean for Faculty Development VTCSOM,
Professor Internal Medicine VTCSOM,
Director Office of Continuing Professional Development Carilion Clinic, and
Professor Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Objectives:

  • Define medical education research and scholarship
  • Distinguish medical education research from other types of research
  • Describe why medical education research matters
  • Develop a research question for a medical education study

Handout: Defining Features of Scholarship Handout

PowerPoint: Scholarship in Medical Education

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Technology in the Classroom by Dr. Corey Heitz
Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate and Medical Education, Carilion Clinic Emergency Medicine/VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with ways to use technology to improve presentations
  • Utilize audience response systems to engage the audience during didactics
  • Gain experience with the use of audience engagement techniques to create interactive learning experiences

PowerPoint: Technology in the Classroom

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Which of the Following? Audience Response Systems in the Classroom by Dr. Corey Heitz
Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate and Medical Education, Carilion Clinic Emergency Medicine/VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Create questions using various Audience Response Systems.
  • Integrate ARS into your Powerpoint Presentations.
  • Use ARS to enhance learner participation.

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One Minute Preceptor by Dr. Bruce Johnson
Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Identify different settings of clinical teaching and understand which setting may be more conducive to a specific teaching skill.
  • Understand the 5 microskills that constitute the “one-minute preceptor”.
  • Recognize consequences of over-emphasis of any particular teaching skill.
  • Utilize the “one-minute preceptor” process in clinical teaching.

PowerPoint: One Minute Preceptor

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Revving Up PowerPoint by Dr. Corey Heitz
Assistant Professor and Director Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate and Medical Education, Carilion Clinic Emergency Medicine/VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Tweak basic presentations to increase interactivity, flow, aesthetics, and audience engagement.
  • Build and use hyperlinks for a variety of activities within presentations.

PowerPoint: Revving Up PowerPoint

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Curriculum Development by Dr. Shari Whicker, Director TEACH Academy, Assistant Professor VTCSOM, Associate Director Office of Continuing Professional Development Carilion Clinic

Objectives:
• Utilize Kern’s six-steps to plan/improve any medical education curriculum
• Incorporate a basic ‘flipped classroom’ techniques into your own teaching

PowerPoint: Curriculum Design

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Flipping the Medical Education Classroom by Dr. Corey Heitz, Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate and Medical Education, Carilion Clinic Emergency Medicine/VTCSOM

Objectives:

  • Describe the background and concept of flipping the classroom
  • Utilize various methods for the flipped classroom in your didactic teaching
  • Discuss methods of using “flipped classroom” concepts in clinical teaching

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Simulation in Healthcare by Dr. Tim Fortuna, Medical Director for Experiential Learning Carilion Clinic

Objectives:

• Define simulation and its uses
• Discuss the learning theory behind simulation education
• List “best practices” associated with positive outcomes in simulation
• Discuss debriefing methods
• Demonstrate the use of a high fidelity manikin in simulation

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