Archived Dean’s Forum Sessions

*No CME credit for archived videos. (CME bylaws state no CME for enduring materials over 1 year old)


Dean’s Forum:
Health Systems Science

During 3 unique sessions, participants were introduced to the concept of Health Systems Science (HSS) and what it could mean for us and our learning environment as we look toward the near future.

Session One:
Introduction to Health Systems Science: The Evolving Identity of Academic Health Centers
Presented by: Jed Gonzalo, MSc, MD,

Associate Dean, Health Systems Education, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Hospital Medicine,
Associate Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine

Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define health systems science – the 4th pillar of medical education,
  • Articulate the significant events that have contributed to the development of health systems science,
  • Highlight several Health Systems Science curricular components that have been implemented along the education continuum,
  • Discuss an evolving identity of academic health centers and how Health Systems Science is contributing to this change.

PowerPoint: Health Systems Science: The Evolving Identity of Academic Health Centers
Handout: Health System Science Framework
Video:


Session Two:
Value-added Medical Education: How Can Medical Students Meaningfully Contribute to Patient Care?
Presented by: Jed Gonzalo, MSc, MD,

Associate Dean, Health Systems Education, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Hospital Medicine,
Associate Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine

Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define value-added medical education,
  • Identify challenges for medical students within clinical learning environments to contribute to patient care,
  • Highlight several examples of pre-clerkship and clerkship roles that can potentially add value to the health system,
  • Identify the intersections between Health Systems Science education and value-added roles and tasks.

Session Three:
Integrating Health System Science Education into a Medical School Curriculum: Challenges, Facilitators, and Strategies
Presented by: Jed Gonzalo, MSc, MD,

Associate Dean, Health Systems Education, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Hospital Medicine,
Associate Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine

Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identity the key challenges involved with integrating Health Systems Science education into a medical school curricula,
  • Articulate the concept of the “implementation dip” in curricular innovations,
  • Describe the Health Systems Science areas within accreditation standards, the graduation questionnaire, and board examination blueprints,
  • Articulate the issues that need to be considered in a systematic strategy for implementing Health Systems Science in medical education. 


Interpreting and Responding to Learner Feedback
This presentation presented on trends and tips in responding to learner feedback.

Presenters:  Drs. Kim Filer and Danielle Lusk of the Center for Instructional Development and Education Research at Virginia Tech

Objectives:

  • Identify trends in evaluations that can inform teaching
  • Determine which feedback warrants pedagogical and other changes
  • Develop an understanding that there is a difference between a few bad evaluations and a whole class perception
  • Develop a template of advice or a decision tree (diagnostic approach) to responding to feedback

PowerPoint: Interpreting and Responding to Learner Feedback

Video:


It’s Not What You Think, It’s How You Think
The presentation was on optimizing learner performance by focusing more on HOW they think rather than WHAT they should know.

Presented by: Dr. Jeffrey Wiese of Tulane University Health Science Center

PowerPoint: It’s Not WHAT You Think, It’s HOW You Think

Video: